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BeccaLeo1972

Posted:
2/16/2016 12:51:53 AM

Ever Wonder...

Do you ever wonder if the cast from Mash the film had done the series how well it would've translated?

Big Daddy O'Reilly

Posted:
2/16/2016 4:04:44 AM

It would certainly be a more plausible scenario today when you consider that more and more movie actors are making the transition to TV, whereas back in those days, many movie actors were considered "too big," "too important," and "too expensive," to even consider lowering themselves to television.

BeccaLeo1972

Posted:
2/16/2016 11:23:41 PM

Today film stars are doing televisions shows on a regular basis. I think its due to television being more accommodating to people of all ages. Also there seem to be more original ideas happening in that realm over the endless recycling going on in movies right now. I do think the film cast of Mash would've worked on the small screen with the obvious toning down for network t.v. at that time.

FinestKindinTN

Posted:
2/18/2016 2:10:19 AM

I wonder who would have been the foil or foils for Hawkeye and Trapper. Major Burns was not a major (so to speak) character in the movie and got shipped out for going crazy. Margaret ends up being part of the "gang" before the movie's end. Major Hobson didn't last long either.
I also wonder who would have made the cast in the TV show ultimately. Spearchucker, Ugly John, and Boone didn't make it through season 1. Forest, Hobson, Painless, and Vollmer didn't even make the TV show.

rainbowbridge

Posted:
2/20/2016 8:18:44 AM

FinestKindinTN wrote:
I wonder who would have been the foil or foils for Hawkeye and Trapper. Major Burns was not a major (so to speak) character in the movie and got shipped out for going crazy. Margaret ends up being part of the "gang" before the movie's end. Major Hobson didn't last long either.
I also wonder who would have made the cast in the TV show ultimately. Spearchucker, Ugly John, and Boone didn't make it through season 1. Forest, Hobson, Painless, and Vollmer didn't even make the TV show.

I've seen the movie a few times but I don't remember a Major Hobson. Unless you mean Major Jonathon Hobbs who was a character in the book.

FinestKindinTN

Posted:
2/21/2016 9:30:10 PM

Yeah, I confused the movie &

book. Major Hobson from the book was the holy roller that Hawkeye and Forest got moved out of the tent shortly after they arrived at the 4077th. I think he got rolled (or holy rolled, you might say) into the Major Burns character in the movie.

BeccaLeo1972

Posted:
2/22/2016 7:08:19 PM

The character Frank was a good opposite for both Hawkeye/Trapper and Hawkeye/B.J. in the series. Robert Duvall's Frank blamed a fresh faced corpsman for the death of a patient. Larry's Frank called out the nurses for what he thought were their mistakes but were all on him. Frank in the series was toned down from the movie version though I still think he was the best choice as again an opposite for Hawkeye/Trapper then Hawkeye/B.J.

BeccaLeo1972

Posted:
2/22/2016 7:10:17 PM

I will always wonder about a Trapper/B.J. pairing with Frank or Charles as the opposite.

BeccaLeo1972

Posted:
2/23/2016 5:44:07 PM

Ever wonder... Why Trapper was married in the series and divorced in the movie? He would have come across better as being single instead of married and cheating.

FinestKindinTN

Posted:
2/24/2016 4:04:57 AM

Perhaps they were trying to combine the Capt Forest and Trapper characters from the movie into one character in the TV series.
I'm not sure what the cheating of the TV Trapper was supposed to show about the character. It didn't seem to fit into any major story lines.
The Trapper character in the series also was not the chest cutter and was not the chief surgeon as he was in the movie. It seems the TV Trapper character got shortchanged in a number of ways.

BeccaLeo1972

Posted:
5/18/2016 10:52:29 PM

Another ever wonder... Why Trapper didn't call or write to Hawkeye after getting home? Maybe he felt guilty for being home before Hawkeye?

FinestKindinTN

Posted:
5/19/2016 1:16:59 AM

BeccaLeo1972 wrote:
Another ever wonder... Why Trapper didn't call or write to Hawkeye after getting home? Maybe he felt guilty for being home before Hawkeye?

And Frank called Hawkeye to say goodbye and Trapper didn't...Of course Frank got to gloat, so he wasn't really saying goodbye.

Hawkeye didn't mention Trapper much either.

I'm guessing the Trapper/Hawkeye thing was more about how Wayne left the show.

Big Daddy O'Reilly

Posted:
5/19/2016 2:50:33 AM

As I've mentioned many times in the past before, I honestly feel like Hawkeye and Trapper's friendship was mainly out of convenience. I'll give Alan and Wayne credit, they did have wonderful chemistry together, but as characters, I really feel that Hawkeye ended up developing more of a deeper connection and relationship with B.J. than with Trapper. Hawkeye and Trapper were kind of thrown together, and they shared similar interests (nurses, booze, and tormenting Frank), so I think they took that for granted. When Trapper went home, I bet he figured to himself he'd probably never see Hawkeye (or anyone from the 4077) again anyway, so he didn't bother trying to get back in touch with any of them because he didn't want to hang on to that little bit of hell from his past. Hawkeye and B.J., on the other hand, they truly bonded with each other: Beej was the newcomer, Hawkeye took him under his wing and helped him adjust to life at the 4077, not to mention their contrasting personalities tested their relationship, but kept it in check, because no matter what, at the end of the day, they were still the best of friends.

BeccaLeo1972

Posted:
5/23/2016 1:58:20 AM

Big Daddy O'Reilly wrote:
As I've mentioned many times in the past before, I honestly feel like Hawkeye and Trapper's friendship was mainly out of convenience. I'll give Alan and Wayne credit, they did have wonderful chemistry together, but as characters, I really feel that Hawkeye ended up developing more of a deeper connection and relationship with B.J. than with Trapper. Hawkeye and Trapper were kind of thrown together, and they shared similar interests (nurses, booze, and tormenting Frank), so I think they took that for granted. When Trapper went home, I bet he figured to himself he'd probably never see Hawkeye (or anyone from the 4077) again anyway, so he didn't bother trying to get back in touch with any of them because he didn't want to hang on to that little bit of hell from his past. Hawkeye and B.J., on the other hand, they truly bonded with each other: Beej was the newcomer, Hawkeye took him under his wing and helped him adjust to life at the 4077, not to mention their contrasting personalities tested their relationship, but kept it in check, because no matter what, at the end of the day, they were still the best of friends.

Trapper must have felt that his relationship with Hawkeye was a war friendship only and didn't carry over to life at home in the states. Radar mentioned in one episode that a lot of guys say they are friends during the war but Hawk and B.J. were the real deal. He knew the two of them would continue their friendship when they got back home.

FinestKindinTN

Posted:
5/24/2016 12:53:37 AM

I wonder if their relationship would have been different had the Trapper character made it 2 or 3 more seasons when the characters were developed more. Although I love the first 3 seasons, the focus was more on the jokes ore gags rather than the relationships between the characters.

Ruptured Brook

Posted:
5/26/2016 5:29:26 PM

I think you're absolutely right, Finest--the difference between Hawkeye's relationships was borne out of the characters' longevity on the show and the mood of the seasons that character was present for. BJ could have a deeper relationship with Hawkeye than Trapper could because BJ was on the show for a longer time, and because seasons 4-11 were more dramatic. Good point!

Big Daddy O'Reilly

Posted:
5/26/2016 10:18:31 PM

I wouldn't say seasons 4-7 were all that dramatic, at least compared to 8-11, but those were the seasons where the dramatic undertones were being utilized a bit more in contrast to Seasons 1-3, which were certainly more straight-up service comedy.

But as far as the point my fellow Volunteer made, that reflects the different approaches the different showrunners took: Larry Gelbart's style was anti-war satire, which he used the ever-lingering Vietnam War to draw parallels from . . . when that war finally came to an end, there went Larry's inspiration for the show's anti-war satire, hence why when Gene Reynolds ran the show, he decided to focus more on character development, which carried over into Burt Metcalfe and Alan Alda's command.

FinestKindinTN

Posted:
5/28/2016 12:00:35 AM

Since we're talking about Trapper and an "ever wonder" thread...
Ever wonder where Trapper lived? I hope I didn't miss it in an episode, but I don't remember hearing. He talked about going to Red Sox games during residency and having a fling with a woman in Chicago.

BeccaLeo1972

Posted:
5/28/2016 12:11:17 AM

FinestKindinTN wrote:
Since we're talking about Trapper and an "ever wonder" thread...
Ever wonder where Trapper lived? I hope I didn't miss it in an episode, but I don't remember hearing. He talked about going to Red Sox games during residency and having a fling with a woman in Chicago.

Good question! It was never mentioned where he actually lived in the series. In the film i believe he said he was from Boston.

FinestKindinTN

Posted:
5/28/2016 12:48:48 AM

BeccaLeo1972 wrote:
Good question! It was never mentioned where he actually lived in the series. In the film i believe he said he was from Boston.

I can't remember if it was specifically Boston, but for sure somewhere in New England. In both the book and film, Trapper and Hawkeye knew of each other before being assigned together and played football against each other in college.

Big Daddy O'Reilly

Posted:
5/28/2016 1:46:58 AM

The series was a lot more vague on where some of the characters lived than the movie and the book were. Another example is Father Mulcahy: supposedly (according to the movie and book) he's from Philadelphia, but I think the only time it was mentioned on the series was he said he taught in a seminary there in one episode. . . . but, he also mentioned in another that he worked his way through divinity school by working as a B-girl in San Diego (obviously a joke, though).

Similar situation with Margaret: I don't think it was ever mentioned at any point in the series where she's from, other than she was "conceived on maneuvers," and that she and her mother followed her father to every army post he was assigned to. That being said, I THINK I read that her hometown was somewhere in Texas . . . which, heh, would explain a LOT.

FinestKindinTN

Posted:
5/28/2016 2:30:03 AM

I made a list of where I think the characters lived.
Hawkeye - Vermont/Crabapple, ME
Trapper - ?? Boston or New England ??
Henry - Bloomington, IL
Frank - Fort Wayne, IN
Margaret - ?
Klinger - Toledo, OH
Mulcahy - ?Philadelphia?
BJ - Mill Valley, CA
Charles - Boston, MA

Big Daddy O'Reilly

Posted:
5/28/2016 3:05:25 AM

FinestKindinTN wrote:
I made a list of where I think the characters lived.
Hawkeye - Vermont/Crabapple, ME
Trapper - ?? Boston or New England ??
Henry - Bloomington, IL
Frank - Fort Wayne, IN
Margaret - ?
Klinger - Toledo, OH
Mulcahy - ?Philadelphia?
BJ - Mill Valley, CA
Charles - Boston, MA

Don't forget:

Radar - Ottumwa, IO
Potter - Hannibal, MO (but for one episode only, it was Nebraska).

FinestKindinTN

Posted:
5/31/2016 2:04:46 AM

Big Daddy O'Reilly wrote:
Don't forget:

Radar - Ottumwa, IO
Potter - Hannibal, MO (but for one episode only, it was Nebraska).

Gosh, how could I forget to list Radar's!
As far as Mulcahy, I seem to remember him talking about seeing the boxing champ who visited the 4077th fight in Philadelphia. I also think that picture Potter painted of the father was supposed to hang in a fictional priests' "hall of fame" in Philly. So I'm pretty confident that's where he grew up; now as far as where he was living when joining the service, we could assume in Philly, but really the church could have assigned him anywhere.
If we assume that Margaret's home was the army, Trapper was the only character that we don't really know from where he came or where he lived.

BeccaLeo1972

Posted:
7/30/2016 10:21:39 PM

Ever wonder what Frank was like as a father?

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